Étude des sols du Manitoba

Soil Survey Manitoba This dataset contains Manitoba Agriculture soil survey data at various scales ranging from highly detailed to broader reconnaissance level information. Soil is essential to human survival. We rely on it for the production of food, fibre, timber and energy crops. Together with climate, the soil determines which crops can be grown, where and how much they will yield. In addition to supporting our agricultural needs, we rely on the soil to regulate the flow of rainwater and to act as a filter for drinking water. With such a tremendously important role, it is imperative that we manage our soils for their long-term productivity, sustainability and health. The first step in sustainable soil management is ensuring that the soil will support the land use activity. For example, only the better agricultural soils in Manitoba will support grain and vegetable production, while more marginal agricultural soils will support forage and pasture-based production. For this reason, agricultural development should only occur in areas where the soil resource will support the agricultural activity. The only way to do this is to understand the soil resource that is available. Soil survey information is the key to understanding the soil resource. Soil survey is an inventory of the properties of the soil (such as texture, internal drainage, parent material, depth to groundwater, topography, degree of erosion, stoniness, pH and salinity) and their spatial distribution over a landscape. Soils are grouped into similar types and their boundaries are delineated on a map. Each soil type has a unique set of physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics and has similar reactions to use and management. The information assembled in a soil survey can be used to predict or estimate the potentials and limitations of the soils’ behaviour under different uses. As such, soil surveys can be used to plan the development of new lands or to evaluate the conversion of land to new uses. Soil surveys also provide insight into the kind and intensity of land management that will be needed. The survey scale of soils data for Manitoba ranges from 1:5,000 to 1:126,720, as identified in the 'SCALE' column.1:5,000. The survey objective at this scale is to collect high precision field scale data and it is mostly used in research plots and other highly intensive areas. It is also applicable to agricultural production and planning such as precision farming, agriculture capability, engineering, recreation, potato/irrigation suitability and productivity indices. Profile descriptions and samples are collected for all soils. At least one soil inspection exists per delineation and the minimum size delineation is 0.25 acres. The soil taxonomy is generally Phases of Soil Series. The mapping scale is 1:5,000 or 12.7 in/ mile. This file also contains soils data that has been collected in Manitoba at a survey intensity level of the second order. This includes data collected at a scale of 1:20,000. The survey objective at this scale is to collect field scale data and it is mostly used in agricultural production and planning such as precision farming, agriculture capability, engineering, recreation, potato/irrigation suitability and productivity indices. Soil pits are generally about 200 metres apart and are dug along transects which are about 500 metres apart. This translates to about 32 inspections sites per section (640 acres). The soils in each delineation are identified by field observations and remotely sensed data. Boundaries are verified at closely spaced intervals. Profile descriptions are collected for all major named soils and 10 inspection sites/section and 2 to 3 horizons per site require lab analyses. At least one soil inspection exists in over 90% of delineations and the minimum size delineation is generally about 4 acres at 1:20,000. The soil taxonomy is generally Phases of Soil Series. The mapping scale is 1:20,000 or 3.2 inch/ mile. This file also contains data that has been collected at the third order. This includes scales of 1:40,000 and 1:50,000. The survey objective at this scale is to collect field scale or regional data. If the topography is relatively uniform, appropriate interpretations include agriculture capability, engineering, recreation, potato/irrigation suitability and productivity indices. Soil pits are generally dug adjacent to section perimeters. This translates to about 16 inspection sites per section (640 acres). Soil boundaries are plotted by observation and remote sensed data. Profile descriptions exist for all major named soils and 2 inspection sites/section and 2 to 3 horizons per site require lab analyses. At least one soil inspection exists in 60-80% of delineations and the minimum size delineation is generally in the 10 to 20 acre range. The soil taxonomy is generally Series or Phases of Soil Series. The mapping scale is 1:40,000 or 2 inch/ mile; 1:50,000 or 1.5 inch/mile. This file also contains soils data that has been collected at a survey intensity level of the fourth order. This includes scales of 1:63,360, 1:100,000, 1:125,000, and 1:126,720. The survey objective is to collect provincial data and to provide general soil information about land management and land use. The number of soil pits dug averaged to about 6 inspections per section (640 acres). Soil boundaries are plotted by interpretation of remotely sensed data and few inspections exist. Profile descriptions are collected for all major named soils. At least one soil inspection exists in 30-60% of delineations and the minimum size delineation is 40 acres (1:63,360), 100 acres (1:100,000), 156 acres (126,700) and 623 acres (250,000). The soil taxonomy is generally phases of Subgroup or Association. As of 2022, soil survey field work and reports are still currently being collected in certain areas where detailed information does not exist. This file will be updated as more information becomes available. Typically, this is conducted on an rural municipality basis. In some areas of Manitoba, more detailed and historical information exists than what is contained in this file. However, at this time, some of this information is only available in a hard copy format. This file will be updated as more of this information is transferred into a GIS format. This file has an organizational framework similar to the original SoilAID digital files and a portion of this geographic extent was originally available on the Manitoba Land Initiative (MLI) website. Domains and coded values have also been integrated into the geodatabase files. This allows the user to view attribute information in either an abbreviated or a more descriptive manner. Choosing to display the description of the coded values allows the user to view the expanded information associated with the attribute value (reducing the need to constantly refer to the descriptions within the metadata). To change these settings in ArcCatalog, go to Customize --> ArcCatalog Options --> Tables tab --> check or uncheck 'Display coded value domain and subtype descriptions'. To change these settings in ArcMap, go to Customize --> ArcMapOptions --> Tables tab --> check or uncheck 'Display coded value domain and subtype descriptions'. This setting can also be changed by opening the attribute table, then Table Options (top left) --> Appearance --> check or uncheck 'Display coded value domain and subtype descriptions'. The file also contains field aliases, which can also be turned on or off under Table Options. The file - "Manitoba Municipal Boundaries" - from Manitoba Community Planning Services was used as one of the base administrative references for the soil polygon layer. Also used as references were the hydrological features mapped in the 1:20,000 and 1:50,000 NTS topographical layers (National Topographic System of Canada). Typically this would relate to larger hydrological features such as those designated as perennial lakes and perennial rivers. This same capability is available in ArcGIS Pro. For more info: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/soil/soil-survey/importance-of-soil-survey-mb.html# 2024-03-27 Gouvernement du Manitoba manitobamaps@gov.mb.ca AgricultureNature et environnementSociété et culture CSVCSV https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca/api/download/v1/items/45fe2e7537ce499bbfe90c15cca2f6f4/csv?layers=0 ArcGIS GeoServiceESRI REST https://services.arcgis.com/mMUesHYPkXjaFGfS/arcgis/rest/services/Soil_Survey_MB/FeatureServer/0 ArcGIS GeoServiceESRI REST https://services.arcgis.com/mMUesHYPkXjaFGfS/arcgis/rest/services/Soil_Survey_MB/FeatureServer/0 GeoJSONGEOJSON https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca/api/download/v1/items/45fe2e7537ce499bbfe90c15cca2f6f4/geojson?layers=0 original metadata (https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca)HTML https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca/maps/manitoba::soil-survey-manitoba KMLKML https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca/api/download/v1/items/45fe2e7537ce499bbfe90c15cca2f6f4/kml?layers=0 ShapefileSHP https://geoportal.gov.mb.ca/api/download/v1/items/45fe2e7537ce499bbfe90c15cca2f6f4/shapefile?layers=0

Cet ensemble de données contient des données d'enquêtes sur les sols du ministère de l'Agriculture du Manitoba à différentes échelles, allant d'informations très détaillées à des informations de niveau de reconnaissance plus large.

Le sol est essentiel à la survie de l'homme. Nous en dépendons pour la production de denrées alimentaires, de fibres, de bois et de cultures énergétiques. Avec le climat, le sol détermine quelles cultures peuvent être cultivées, où et combien elles produiront. En plus de subvenir à nos besoins agricoles, nous comptons sur le sol pour réguler le débit des eaux de pluie et pour servir de filtre à l'eau potable. Compte tenu de ce rôle extrêmement important, il est impératif que nous gérions nos sols pour leur productivité, leur durabilité et leur santé à long terme. La première étape de la gestion durable des sols consiste à s'assurer que le sol soutiendra l'activité d'utilisation des terres. Par exemple, seuls les meilleurs sols agricoles du Manitoba favoriseront la production de céréales et de légumes, tandis que les sols agricoles plus marginaux favoriseront la production de fourrage et de pâturage. Pour cette raison, le développement agricole ne devrait avoir lieu que dans les zones où les ressources du sol soutiendront l'activité agricole. La seule façon d'y parvenir est de comprendre les ressources en sol disponibles. Les informations issues de l'étude des sols sont essentielles pour comprendre les ressources du sol. L'étude des sols est un inventaire des propriétés du sol (telles que la texture, le drainage interne, le matériau d'origine, la profondeur de la nappe phréatique, la topographie, le degré d'érosion, le caractère pierreux, le pH et la salinité) et leur distribution spatiale dans un paysage. Les sols sont regroupés en types similaires et leurs limites sont délimitées sur une carte. Chaque type de sol possède un ensemble unique de caractéristiques physiques, chimiques et minéralogiques et présente des réactions similaires à l'utilisation et à la gestion. Les informations recueillies lors d'une étude des sols peuvent être utilisées pour prédire ou estimer les potentiels et les limites du comportement des sols sous différentes utilisations. À ce titre, les études de sol peuvent être utilisées pour planifier le développement de nouvelles terres ou pour évaluer la conversion de terres à de nouveaux usages. Les études de sol fournissent également un aperçu du type et de l'intensité de la gestion des terres qui sera nécessaire. L'échelle d'enquête des données sur les sols pour le Manitoba varie de 1:5 000 à 1:126 720, comme indiqué dans la colonne « ÉCHELLE ». 1:5 000. L'objectif de l'enquête à cette échelle est de collecter des données de haute précision à l'échelle du terrain et elles sont principalement utilisées dans les parcelles de recherche et autres zones très intensives. Il s'applique également à la production et à la planification agricoles telles que l'agriculture de précision, les capacités agricoles, l'ingénierie, les loisirs, l'adéquation des pommes de terre et à l'irrigation et les indices de productivité. Les descriptions des profils et les échantillons sont collectés pour tous les sols. Il existe au moins une inspection du sol par délimitation et la taille minimale est de 0,25 acre. La taxonomie des sols est généralement la série Phases of Soil. L'échelle cartographique est de 1:5 000 ou 12,7 po/mile. Ce fichier contient également des données sur les sols qui ont été recueillies au Manitoba à un niveau d'intensité d'enquête de second ordre. Cela inclut les données collectées à une échelle de 1:20 000. L'objectif de l'enquête à cette échelle est de collecter des données à l'échelle du terrain et celles-ci sont principalement utilisées pour la production et la planification agricoles, telles que l'agriculture de précision, les capacités agricoles, l'ingénierie, les loisirs, l'adéquation des pommes de terre et l'irrigation et les indices de productivité. Les fosses à sol sont généralement espacées d'environ 200 mètres et sont creusées le long de transects distants d'environ 500 mètres. Cela se traduit par environ 32 sites d'inspection par section (640 acres). Les sols de chaque délimitation sont identifiés par des observations sur le terrain et des données de télédétection. Les limites sont vérifiées à intervalles rapprochés. Des descriptions de profils sont recueillies pour tous les principaux sols nommés et 10 sites/section d'inspection et 2 à 3 horizons par site nécessitent des analyses en laboratoire. Au moins une inspection du sol est effectuée dans plus de 90 % des délimitations et la délimitation de la taille minimale est généralement d'environ 4 acres à 1:20 000. La taxonomie des sols est généralement la série Phases of Soil. L'échelle cartographique est de 1:20 000 ou 3,2 pouces/mile. Ce fichier contient également des données qui ont été collectées lors de la troisième commande. Cela inclut les échelles de 1:40 000 et 1:50 000. L'objectif de l'enquête à cette échelle est de collecter des données à l'échelle du terrain ou des données régionales. Si la topographie est relativement uniforme, les interprétations appropriées incluent la capacité agricole, l'ingénierie, les loisirs, l'adéquation des pommes de terre et à l'irrigation et les indices de productivité. Les fosses de sol sont généralement creusées à proximité des périmètres des sections. Cela se traduit par environ 16 sites d'inspection par section (640 acres). Les limites du sol sont tracées à l'aide de données d'observation et de télédétection. Des descriptions de profils existent pour tous les principaux sols nommés et 2 sites/section d'inspection et 2 à 3 horizons par site nécessitent des analyses en laboratoire. Au moins une inspection du sol est effectuée dans 60 à 80 % des délimitations et la délimitation de la taille minimale se situe généralement entre 10 et 20 acres. La taxonomie des sols est généralement une série ou une phase d'une série de sols. L'échelle de cartographie est de 1:40 000 ou 2 pouces/mile ; 1:50 000 ou 1,5 pouce/mile. Ce fichier contient également des données sur les sols qui ont été collectées à un niveau d'intensité d'enquête du quatrième ordre. Cela inclut les échelles de 1:63 360, 1:100 000, 1:125 000 et 1:126 720. L'objectif de l'enquête est de recueillir des données provinciales et de fournir des informations générales sur les sols concernant la gestion et l'utilisation des terres. Le nombre de fosses creusées dans le sol était en moyenne d'environ 6 inspections par section (640 acres). Les limites du sol sont tracées par interprétation de données de télédétection et il existe peu d'inspections. Les descriptions des profils sont collectées pour tous les principaux sols nommés. Au moins une inspection du sol est effectuée dans 30 à 60 % des délimitations et la taille minimale est de 40 acres (1:63 360), 100 acres (1:100 000), 156 acres (126 700) et 623 acres (250 000). La taxonomie des sols comprend généralement des phases de sous-groupe ou d'association. En 2022, les travaux de terrain et les rapports d'étude des sols sont toujours en cours de collecte dans certaines zones où des informations détaillées n'existent pas. Ce fichier sera mis à jour au fur et à mesure que de plus amples informations seront disponibles. En règle générale, cela se fait au niveau des municipalités rurales. Dans certaines régions du Manitoba, il existe des informations historiques plus détaillées que celles contenues dans ce dossier. Cependant, pour le moment, certaines de ces informations ne sont disponibles que sur papier. Ce fichier sera mis à jour au fur et à mesure que ces informations seront transférées au format SIG. Ce fichier possède un cadre organisationnel similaire aux fichiers numériques originaux de SoilAid et une partie de cette étendue géographique était initialement disponible sur le site Web de la Manitoba Land Initiative (MLI). Les domaines et les valeurs codées ont également été intégrés dans les fichiers de géodatabase. Cela permet à l'utilisateur de visualiser les informations relatives aux attributs de manière abrégée ou plus descriptive. Le choix d'afficher la description des valeurs codées permet à l'utilisateur de visualiser les informations détaillées associées à la valeur d'attribut (ce qui réduit le besoin de se référer constamment aux descriptions contenues dans les métadonnées). Pour modifier ces paramètres dans ArcCatalog, accédez à Personnaliser -> Options ArcCatalog -> onglet Tables -> cochez ou décochez « Afficher les descriptions des domaines et des sous-types à valeurs codées ». Pour modifier ces paramètres dans ArcMap, accédez à Personnaliser -> ArcMapOptions -> onglet Tableaux -> cochez ou décochez « Afficher les descriptions des domaines et des sous-types à valeurs codées ». Ce paramètre peut également être modifié en ouvrant la table attributaire, puis en cochant ou décochant « Afficher les descriptions des domaines et des sous-types de valeurs codées » (en haut à gauche) -> Apparence -> Apparence ->. Le fichier contient également des alias de champs, qui peuvent également être activés ou désactivés dans Options du tableau. Le fichier intitulé « Limites municipales du Manitoba » des Services de planification communautaire du Manitoba a été utilisé comme référence administrative de base pour la couche polygonale du sol. Les caractéristiques hydrologiques cartographiées dans les couches topographiques du NTS 1:20 000 et 1:50 000 (Système topographique national du Canada) ont également été utilisées comme références. Cela concerne généralement des caractéristiques hydrologiques plus importantes telles que celles désignées comme des lacs pérennes et des rivières pérennes. Cette même fonctionnalité est disponible dans ArcGIS Pro. Pour plus d'informations : https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/soil/soil-survey/importance-of-soil-survey-mb.html #

Cet élément de métadonnées provenant d’une tierce partie a été traduit à l'aide d'un outil de traduction automatisée (Amazon Translate).

Données et ressources

Coordonnées

Adresse de courrier électronique: manitobamaps@gov.mb.ca

Dossiers similaires